Degree Requirements

The 45-hour Interdisciplinary Behavioral Science Psychology and Law Concentration is designed to be research-oriented. Those who enroll in degree program may opt to complete either a thesis or a professional paper option, although emphasis will be placed on the thesis option described below.

Thesis Option

Class Credits
Core 18 Total
Psychology & Law 3
Law & Social Science 3
Intermediate Statistics I & II 6
Research Methods I & II 6
Criminal Behavior 12 Total
Theories of Offending & Corrections 3
Psychology of Criminal Behavior 3
Aggression & Violence 3
Assessment & Treatment of Offenders 3
Electives 6 Total
Diversity & Law 3
Addiction & Psychopharmacology 3
Psychology of Victims 3
Special Topics (up to 6 hours) 3
Comprehensive Exam 3 Total
Thesis 6 Total

The table below presents a curriculum plan for the Thesis Option, outlining the sequence of courses. The curriculum plan assumes a 4-6 semester completion schedule for full-time students and a completion schedule of 6-8 semesters for part-time students.

  Credits Total
Fall Year 1
Psychology & Law 3
Intermediate Statistics 3
Research Methods 3
9
Spring Year 1
Law & Social Science 3
Intermediate Statistics II 3
Research Methods II 3
9
Summer Year 1
Core or Electives 0 - 9 0 - 9
Fall Year 2
Psychology of Criminal Behavior 3
Assessment & Treatment of Offenders 3
Offending & Corrections 3
9
Spring Year 2
Aggression & Violence 3
Thesis II 3
Comprehensive Exam 3
9
Summer Year 2
As needed.
45

Students opting for the thesis plan should complete their Master’s degree program requirements over a period of four semesters or less, i.e., not more than two years, and should adhere to the following schedule:

  • Complete at least 12 credits of coursework by the end of the second semester in the program and sign up for the remaining 18 credit hours (including 6 hours of thesis credit) during the third and fourth semesters in the program;
  • Form a thesis committee by the beginning of the third semester in the program and complete and obtain approval of the thesis proposal by the end of the third semester in the program;
  • Write the thesis during the fourth semester and schedule an oral exam over the thesis and obtain its approval at the end of the fourth semester in the program.

To be making progress in the program and to be eligible for continued departmental funding, students must follow the above stated guidelines.


Non-Thesis Option

The table below presents the curriculum for the Non-Thesis Option, outlining the sequence of courses. The curriculum plan also assumes a 4-6 semester completion schedule for full-time students and a completion schedule of 6-8 semesters for part-time students.

Class Credits
Core 18 Total
Psychology & Law 3
Law & Social Science 3
Intermediate Statistics I & II 6
Research Methods I & II 6
Electives 21 Total
Theories of Offending & Corrections 3
Psychology of Criminal Behavior 3
Aggression & Violence 3
Assessment & Treatment of Offenders 3
Diversity & Law 3
Addiction & Psychopharmacology 3
Psychology of Victims 3
Special Topics (up to 6 hours) 3
Comprehensive Exam 3 Total
Professional Paper 3 Total

The table below presents a proposed curriculum plan for the Non-Thesis Option, outlining the sequence of courses. The curriculum plan assumes a 4-6 semester completion schedule for full-time students and a completion schedule of 6-8 semesters for part-time students.

  Credits Total
Fall Year 1
Psychology & Law 3
Intermediate Statistics 3
Research Methods 3
9
Spring Year 1
Law & Social Science 3
Intermediate Statistics II 3
Research Methods II 3
9
Summer Year 1
Core or Electives 9 9
Fall Year 2
Psychology of Criminal Behavior 3
Assessment & Treatment of Offenders 3
Offending & Corrections 3
9
Spring Year 2
Aggression & Violence 3
Professional Paper 3
Comprehensive Exam 3
9
Summer Year 2
As needed.
45

Students opting for the non-thesis plan should also complete their program requirements over a period of not more than two years and should adhere to the following schedule:

  • Complete at least 15 credits of coursework by the beginning of the third semester in the program and sign up for the remaining 18 credit hours of coursework during the third and fourth semesters in the program;
  • Schedule to take comprehensive exams at the end of the fourth semester in the program by signing up for 1 credit of comps during this fourth and final semester.
  • Students opting for the non-thesis plan will need to make arrangements to take the Master’s comprehensive examinations two months prior to their anticipated graduation date.

NEW FALL 2019

Counseling Psychology Concentration Curriculum (60 hours)

The goal of the Kentucky State University Counseling program will be to guide and facilitate student
development of an advanced understanding of the field, helping them to develop a high level of
competency in the areas of Counseling Psychology and the intersection of Psychology and the legal
system consistent with the scientist-practitioner model. The term “scientist-practitioner” has been
traditionally used by the American Psychological Association to describe most APA-accredited training
programs in Counseling Psychology. Psychology is considered a STEM discipline, and as the term
implies, psychologists are generally trained to be both scientists and practitioners. The integration of
science and practice is highly valued by members of the discipline; the proposed program will require
coursework in both research and practice, and the integration of science and practice will be
emphasized throughout.

Fall Year 1 Credits Spring Year 1 Credits  
Theory & Practice of Counseling 3 Evidence-Based Counseling 3
Intermediate Statistics I 3 Intermediate Statistics II 3
Intermediate Research Methods I 3 Intermediate Research Methods II 3
Summer Year 1
Core or Electives 0-9
Fall Year 2 Spring Year 2
Assessment & Evaluation Techniques 3 Cultural Diversity 3
Group Dynamics & Group Counseling 3 Legal & Ethical Issues 3
Practicum 3 Internship I 3
Summer Year 2
Core or Electives 0-9
Fall Year 3 Spring Year 3
Internship II 3 As needed

Comprehensive Exam
3

The Comprehensive Exam will consist of 3 credit hours of preparation for completion of the Kentucky
examination for licensure as a Licensed Professional Counselor. For information about this process,
please click on the following link:
Kentucky Public Protection Cabinet Department of Professional Licensing


Comprehensive Examination Requirements

The M.A. comprehensive examinations will consist of three parts

  1. Theory;
  2. Methods;
  3. Substantive Area /Special Area.
  • The theory exam and the exam on a substantive area within the field are to be taken in the department on two different days (4 hours each exam) within one week.
  • The methods exam is a take-home exam that must be completed over the course of the following week.
  • The exam on a substantive area in the field may be based on a course the student has taken in the department or an area the student has studied under the supervision of a faculty member through independent readings or research.

All three exams will be comprehensive and may cover a wide range of topics and issues. They will be graded on the basis of the following scale: High Pass; Pass; Fail. Students who fail to pass a particular exam may schedule to re-take that exam one more time.

All exams will be administered by the Program Coordinator, graded by the faculty member(s) submitting the question(s), and reviewed by the Program Coordinator and faculty member together for a final decision.